Tuesday, February 19, 2008

Welcome to my new blog

This is a test.  This is a new blog for shepherds and people who care about sheep.

8 comments:

Floyd Ells said...

Hi HillShepherd...

I like your blog. I'm also new at blogging and share your enthusiasm for animals.

Floyd

Gimmer said...

Thanks for coming by and having a look Floyd.

Anonymous said...

Hi Beth.

You really have been busy. All that's needed now is a wee sang.

Terry

Gimmer said...

I will be doing songs too but not as much as I can direct people to the link at the top of the page to "A Shepherds Songbook" where I have published many to my website. I do have some new ones to add to that shortly and will introduce them on the blog first. Thanks for coming by, Terry.
-Beth

Anonymous said...

Hi Beth,
HillShepherd....I like it! The poems are a new thing for me-never knew that there were any pertaining to sheep but we learn something new every day. Spring is almost here and lambing season is close-time of renewal,hard work,and small miracles. Hope all is well at The Croft.
Dan.

Gimmer said...

Hi Dan, the other Hill Shepherd. Be sure to feel free to post a story about your flock here some time. No lambs at Thistledown as yet. This blog won't be just for poems but I had some good ones to share. I am looking forward to those first lambs. I trust all is well with you up in your fold.

-Beth

Anonymous said...

Hi Beth,
I was enjoying your virtual museum of shearing, but took exception to the statement that just about the only use of handshears is for blocking, as I've gone back to the hand shears the past couple of years! I find it much more relaxing, and the sheep are quieter because it's so much quieter - none of that loud vibration around their heads.
I'm finding that it takes me only about two or three minutes longer with the blades than it does with the machine - guess that just means I'm slow with the machine!
I sheared for the Sheep to Shawl contest at the Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival last year and the year before for the Red Rose Treadling Toes sheep to shawl team from Hanover, using my blades - got quite a few comments from people who couldn't believe the team would use a blade shearer in a speed contest! (It was their stealth psychological weapon against the confidence of the other teams.)

I was inspired in part by Kevin Ford, who taught blade shearing at the Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival a few years back, and who has put together a lovely book on blade shearing (Shearing Day, by Kevin Ford). It is well worth reading just for the peacefulness and satisfaction in good labor that comes through so clearly in his prose. So often, I have found that the old "hard" way of doing things, whether it's sheep shearing or posthole digging, is in many ways better than the modern, powered way.
Anyway, love your blog!
Roy

Gimmer said...

Hi Roy, I was not saying hand shearing is not a fine way to shear I was simply remarking few people use them anymore except for trimming. It is a shame really, it is almost a lost art form. I am sure there are far fewer shearing cuts on the sheep. There is nothing more wonderful than watching shearing done the old fashioned way! Thanks for posting here and for visiting the Virtual Shearing museum. If you happen to have a photo of yourself hand shearing submit it to me and I will post it in the Virtual Museum of Shearing. Yours, Beth

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