Sunday, April 27, 2008

THIS IS NAE MY PLAID



CHORUS
O this is nae my plaid, my plaid, my plaid,
O this is nae my plaid, bonnie tho' the colour be.

The ground of mine wis mixed wi blue
I got it frae the lad I lo'e
He ne'er has gi'en me cause to rue
An O the plaid is dear to me.

For mine was silky saft an warm,
It rap't me roun frae arm to arm,
An like himsel it bore a charm
An O the plaid is dear to me.

Frae surly blasts it covers me
He'll me himsel protection gie
I'll lo'e him till the day I de'e
His plaid shall aye be dear to me.

The time may come my ain dear lad
When we will to the kirk and wad
Wed happit in thy tartan plaid
That plaid shall aye be dear to me.

For this will then be my plaid
My plaid my plaid
O this will then be my plaid
An while I live shall ever be.


Sung by Aileen Carr
http://www.folkmusic.net/scotswomen/people_aileen.htm

Before the 18th century most sheep in Scotland were the now extinct "Highland Sheep" variety most like more primative examples of the Soay, Hebridean and Shetland breeds. These sheep produced wool which was naturally shed - a bit like a dog's coat - and therefore had to be gathered or pulled-out, rather than shorn. This was called rooing. The white sheep in particular would be useful since the wool could be more easily dyed. During the 18th century new breeds were introduced into the Highlands - the Scottish Blackface and the Cheviot sheep. When the wool was woven into material, it produced a much coarser tartan than the fine quality tartan woven today

No comments:

The Rams Horn

The Rams Horn on Facebook